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Neutering

Cats

We advise neutering at 4 1/2 months of age for all male and female cats. This is based on advice from 'The Cat Group'  - a collection of professional organisations dedicated to feline welfare including the Feline Advisory Bureau, RSPCA, Blue Cross, PDSA, ISFM and BSAVA (British Small Animal Veterinary Association). Neutering at this time reduces the risk of unwanted pregnancy and disease. 

In females the uterus and ovaries are removed through a small incision in the tummy - it is similar to a hysterectomy in people.

In males both testicles are removed though very small incisions in the scrotum.

Dogs

Female dogs will usually be speyed 3 - 4 months after the end of their first season (which could be anywhere from 7 - 18 months of age depending on the breed and individual).

Male dogs will normally be castrated from 10 months of age but again it depends on the individual. Some dogs are much better left until older before they are castrated - please ask your Vet or Nurse or call the practice for advice and to book a free Pre-Neutering Check.

In females the uterus and ovaries are removed through an incision in the tummy - it is similar to a hysterectomy in people.

In males both testicles are removed though one small incision just in front of  the scrotum.

Rabbits

Neutering rabbits not only reduced the number of unwanted pet rabbits but also has many health and social benefits. Rabbits are social animals and should not be on their own and neutering will allow pairs or groups to live together more happily and without the risk of pregnancy. 

Female rabbits are protected from common problems such as uterine cancer.

We recommend neutering male rabbits from 4 1/2 months and females from 5. Rabbits are routinely intubated  during anaesthesia using isoflurane. 

In females the uterus and ovaries are removed through an incision in the tummy - it is similar to a hysterectomy in people.

In males both testicles are removed though two small incisions in the scrotum. 

We usually hospitalise rabbits overnight to ensure they are eating and passing faeces before they go home to you.

So what happens on the day?

You will be given (or sent in the post) our pre operative advice sheet to help prepare you and your pet for the day.

Cats and dogs need to have had nothing to eat since 8 pm the previous evening. You can leave a water bowl down overnight, but take it up first thing in the morning. Please make sure your dog has been out for a wee!

Rabbits do not need to be starved overnight and should have their usual access to food and water.

Cats and dogs are just with us for the day, coming in first thing in the morning and going home some time in the afternoon. If you work late you are welcome to collect your pet later on - we are open until 8pm.  

Your female cat and both male and female dogs will have 3-4 days of post operative pain killers to go home with after their operation, to ensure they are comfortable. Rabbits also go home with post operative pain relief. This is included in the price of the operation, as are the post operative check ups.

Dogs, Rabbits and female cats will be invited back for a post operative check 2-3 days after surgery to check  their wounds are healing properly.  Male cats tend not to need any post operative checks but we are always happy to see any pet if you are worried about them after surgery. 

Our surgeons usually use a technique where the external sutures are 'buried'. This means there are not usually sutures sticking out to irritate your pet! Occasionally there are external sutures which are removed 10 days after surgery.

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