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Category: Cancer

As many as one in five dogs are likely to develop one of the many different forms of cancer at some stage of their lives. The risk of developing cancer increases with age. This means that, as dogs now enjoy a longer life expectancy through improved veterinary care, the number of animals with cancer has been increasing in recent years.

The signs of cancer are very variable and depend on the type of tissue cells involved, the site of the cancer and the stage of the disease. Animals with advanced cancers often show weight loss and loss of appetite. If your dog has cancer it may be depressed, vomit, have diarrhoea or constipation or fever. Your dog may also get tired easily because of other effects caused by the cancer, eg anaemia. Cancer can occur in any animal and at any age, but certain types of dog are more likely to get certain forms of cancer.

The survival chances will depend not only on the type and stage of the disease but also on your dog’s general state of health. You should discuss this issue with your own vet so that you can agree between you an appropriate treatment plan for your dog. It is understandable that, faced with a diagnosis of cancer, you will feel frightened about the future for your pet. Discussing your fears with your vet is the very best way to obtain reassurance and an independent assessment that you are doing what is right for your pet.

Canine Lymphoma

There are many different forms of lymphoma in the dog, just as there are in humans. Some types of lymphoma are associated with better outcomes than others but most types respond favourably to the administration of chemotherapy. There are some

Canine Insulinoma

Insulinoma is a cancer of the pancreas, which can cause affected dogs to have a poor exercise tolerance or even collapse. Early diagnosis of this condition is essential to provide the most effective therapy. How would I know if my

Canine Cutaneous Mast Cell Tumors

Mast cell tumours are common tumours of the skin in dogs. Whilst many mast cell tumours can be cured by appropriate management, dogs that get one mast cell tumour can frequently develop other separate mast cell tumours elsewhere on their

Cancer In Your Dog – Possible Options

Cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. The speed with which a cancer spreads and the severity of the disease it causes depends on the type of tissue cell affected. As many as one in five dogs are likely

Brain tumour or cancer

Brain tumours in dogs are unfortunately as common as they are in people. Brain tumours can be devastating diseases and sadly cannot be cured in most animals. At present the only options for treatment are to improve the animal's quality

Anal sac gland carcinoma

Anal sac gland carcinoma (also known as apocrine gland carcinoma of the anal sacs and anal sac adenocarcinoma) is a malignant tumour of the anal sacs of the dog. It is a relatively uncommon tumour but it is seen with